CITA-A

O Instituto de Investigação e Tecnologia da Agronomia e Meio Ambiente (IITAA) desenvolve trabalho de investigação com o objetivo de perseguir estudos em diversas áreas, como a caracterização / previsão do clima insular e os efeitos das mudanças globais em comunidades do... Ler mais »

PUBLICAÇÕES

Gap dynamics and regeneration strategies in Juniperus-Laurus forests of the Azores Islands.

Clima, Ambiente e Paisagem

+ Info

Referência

Elias R. B. & Dias E. 2009. Gap dynamics and regeneration strategies in Juniperus-Laurus forests of the Azores Islands. Plant Ecology, 200: 179-189.

Resumo

We asked the following questions regarding gap dynamics and regeneration strategies in Juniperus-Laurus forests: How important are gaps for the maintenance of tree diversity? What are the regeneration strategies of the tree species? Thirty canopy openings were randomly selected in the forest and in each the expanded gap area was delimited. Inside expanded gaps the distinction was made between gap and transition zone. In the 30 expanded gaps a plot, enclosing the gap and transition zone, was placed. In order to evaluate the differences in regeneration and size structure of tree species between forest and expanded gaps, 30 control plots were also delimited in the forest, near each expanded gap. In the 60 plots the number of seedlings, saplings, basal sprouts and adults of tree species were registered. Canopy height and width of adult individuals were also measured. The areas of the 30 gaps and expanded gaps were measured and the gap-maker identified. Juniperus-Laurus forests have a gap dynamic associated with small scale disturbances that cause the death, on average, of two trees, mainly of Juniperus brevifolia. Gap and expanded gap average dimensions are 8 and 25 m2, respectively. Gaps are of major importance for the maintenance of tree diversity since they are fundamental for the regeneration of all species, with the exception of Ilex azorica. Three types of regeneration behaviour and five regeneration strategies were identified: (1) Juniperus brevifolia and Erica azorica are pioneer species that regenerate in gaps from seedlings recruited after gap formation. However, Juniperus brevifolia is a pioneer persistent species capable of maintaining it self in the forest due to a high longevity and biomass; (2) Laurus azorica and Frangula azorica are primary species that regenerate in gaps from seedlings or saplings recruited before gap formation but Laurus azorica is able to maintain it self in the forest through asexual regeneration thus being considered a primary persistent species; (3) Ilex azorica is a mature species that regenerates in the forest.

Domingo, 01 Fevereiro, 2009

Equipa

    Ver todas as publicações

 
Web Development: Via Oceânica, 2009
English